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born in billings, montana where the parents lived for five to six years. one son these days, okay, and came back to billings, married a girl who is a part of a large family. now he is part of that large family and he is building a large family and he won't budge. he is totally attached. the other one, and his story is fascinating. he is in montana and this is not a rich family but there is some rich man in montana who pays for one kid a year, for the four year duration of school, to go to st. paul's school in concord, new hampshire. beaches base for the whole thing. he find some super bright kid. this boy couldn't study language in billings, so he signed up and he was accepted. then he got cold feet and turned him down. then he reconsidered and his parents had never been to see the place. they didn't even know what he was up to 70 reconsidered and called them up and said i think i do want to do that. as it was, it was too late but let's see what we can do for you. he gets into hotchkiss and the richman puts them in hotchkiss. in one year he is boy of the year at hotchkiss, a broad
were born in billings montana when there parents went for five or six years. one son these days, came back to billings, married a girl who was part of a large family. now he is part of that large family and he is building a large family. and he will not budge. he is just totally attached. the other one, and his story is just fascinating, is in montana. and this is not a rich family, but there is some rich man in montana who pays for one kid a year -- well, for the four-year duration of school to go to saint paul school and new hampshire. you just paste the whole thing. he goes and finds some super bright kid or so this boy couldn't study languages in billings. and so he signed up and he was accepted. and then he got cold feet and turned him down. then he reconsider. is terratec never even been to see the place. they didn't know what he was up to. and so he reconsider and called him up and said no, i think i do want to do that. it's too late, but let's see what we can do for him. so he gets into hotchkiss, and the rich man puts them in hotchkiss. in one year he is boy of the year at ho
. >> no my father made $40,000 a year. i'm sorry. >> do you have any idea how much hannah montana makes? >> if i said yes, i should be in the -- >> would it surprise you to know that she makes over $50 million a year? >> right. she didn't ruin the economy. >> don't ask him how much the mayor of las vegas makes, okay? [laughter] >> now, i want to -- here's my question to you, sir. can we agree that someone who runs a major company with thousands if not ten of thousand office employees, who has oversight over bills if not dentals of bills billions of dollars, if that company is well managed, do you have a problem witch that person making as much money as hannah montana makes, and a-rod. >> are you saying that stan o'neill well managed his company? are you saying jim cain was a great ceo? >> i'm asking -- >> look. >> i'm not here to defend ceos who ran their companys into the ground. i think they should -- >> you're here to defend yourself. >> what i'm asking you is, whoa -- don't you believe, sir, that is right it should be the boards of directors and the shareholders, not members of cong
montana makes? >> would it surprise, you, sir, to know she makes over $50 million. >> she didn't blow up the economy. >> mr. moore, don't ask him how much the mayor of las vegas makes, ok? >> now here is my question to you, sir. can we agree that someone who runs a major company with thousands, if not tens of thousands of employees, who has oversight over billions, if not tens of billions of dollars, if that company is well managed and makes a profit for the shareholders, do you have a problem, sir, with that person making as much money as hannah montana makes and a-rod and lebron james? >> are you saying that dan o'neal well managed his came? are you saying that kaine was a great c.e.o.? >> no, i'm -- look, i am not here to defend c.e.o.'s who ran their companies in to the ground. >> mr. moore, you're here to defend yourself. >> what i'm asking you, is why do we -- don't you believe, sir, that it should be the boards of directors and the shareholders, not members of congress, who determine what the salaries are of these companies? after all, the shareholders are the owners of the compan
much money hannah montana makes every year? what a surprise hit 66 >> if i said yes -- >> what a surprise you to know that she makes over $50 million a year? can i -- >> mr. moore don't ask how much the mayor of las vegas makes. [laughter] [applause]@รบ o'neill well-managed his company and that o'neal was a great ceo? >> i am asking -- look, i am not here to defend ceos. i think that they should -- >> mr. moore, you are here to defend it yourself. [laughter] >> what i am asking is don't you believe, sir, it should be the boards of directors and shareholders, not members of congress to determine what the salaries are of these companies after all the shareholders are the owners of the company, right? >> of course, but you forget one little piece. the government is a shareholder right now. >> that's the whole problem. >> the need a shareholder to play them out. >> i can play both sides of this. it's a sick. >> this is a squeal the witness. >> this is why people don't -- >> let me ask about housing crisis because you're an expert. would you agree with the promise that the housing s
these ideas, reinforced by the hollywood roles such as montana molan? do you think that this brought back a sort of mental slavery on that next generation that we are dealing with now to this point? >> yes. i should have you appear. and to answer the question of what happened. completely agree. so the reason why it ended was because the former masters did not believe, could not believe that we thought we were better than our segregation. that we actually had the nerve to become equals, right? that was the reason segregation construction and. we were taking advantage of all the opportunities and we no longer were slaves. and i think what happened, which is fascinating, that there was -- our history has been eaten out of us. i am literally in the sense it has been destroyed. there was a georgian lawmaker that was quoted as saying he wanted to destroy any record of african-american -- of freed slaves in the legislature because they had the nerve to be our colleagues. so at a certain point in certain states you know longer have records of freed slaves as lawmakers. going to go to the state se
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6